Grand Opening

The Grove at Keith Creek

On a beautiful, sunny, early fall morning, more than 175 people from our community joined together on September 28, 2017 for the official Grand Opening & Ribbon Cutting Ceremony at the Grove, at Keith Creek.

What an awesome celebration it was! Special thanks to Master of Ceremony, Andre Blakley, Illinois Market President of Gorman & Company, and Father Beauvais who provided the Invocation. Thanks to the many presenters, for your all your kind words and support; Ron Clewer, Former CEO, RHA; Jerry Lumpkins, Chairman of the Board, RHA Housing Commissioner; Tom McNamara, Rockford, Il, Mayor; Andy DeCoux, Director of Multifamily Finance, IHDA; Antonio Riley, Former Regional Administrator Region V – The Midwest Chicago Regional Office U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD); and Larry Williams, CEO, RHA.

The Grove at Keith Creek is the new, multi-family residential community with 49 apartment homes set on a six -acre landscaped campus, which is the New Blueprint for Affordable Housing in Rockford.

The community was able to tour the grounds and view the one and two-story townhome/duplex style buildings, designed in traditional colonial and craftsman style to enhance and compliment the surrounding neighborhood.

The community center was designed to provide the stage for educational and cultural programming, along with a state of the art computer lab for the residents. The children’s playground was a highlight and garden plots are set for spring planting which are also located on the six-acre site.

Gorman & Company in conjunction with the Rockford Housing Authority and Bridge Rockford is proud to share this short video documenting the Ribbon Cutting Ceremony. This Affordable Housing plan is the initial component of a five-year masterplan to transform conventional public housing in Rockford, IL.

The Grove at Keith Creek is a public/private partnership developed by Gorman & Company with Bridge Rockford Alliance, a nonprofit subsidiary of the Rockford Housing Authority, the Illinois Housing Development Authority (IHDA), Boston Capital and Citibank.

Gorman & Company is partnering with the Rockford Housing Authority (RHA) to replace and revision 385 existing units of public housing at scattered sites, incorporating fresh architectural solutions, social and educational support and a strong homeowner component for the community. “A great community starts with a commitment to being a great neighbor”, stated Andre Blakely, Illinois Market President, Gorman & Company, Inc.

Extraordinary thanks to all guests and event speakers, as well as the staff of all the vested organizations who provided this dedication event for our community. “This marks the beginning of the next chapter of housing in the Rockford community, stated Larry Williams CEO of RHA. “This Affordable Housing plan gives our residents new opportunities as well as the capability to expand our services as needed, in the years to come for our community residents.”

With two phases down, Union Corners looks ahead to final developments

By Abigail Becker, The Cap Times

The second phase of the $78 million development known as Union Corners unfolded Wednesday with the grand opening of a $19 million, 90-unit mixed-income apartment complex.

Interview by Eden Checkol, WISC-TV News 3

Named after the battery company that formerly occupied the site, Carbon at Union Corners includes two four-story buildings joined by a courtyard and path that leads to East Washington Avenue. There is 18,000-square-feet of ground floor retail space and 92 underground parking spaces at the complex on Winnebago Street.

Ald. Marsha Rummel, District 6, said the development is a strong example of creating a neighborhood and not just “plopping in some buildings” into a vacant space.

“There is now a community that will evolve here and be part of a bigger neighborhood, and I’m proud to be a part of it,” Rummel said.

Of the 90 units, 76 are affordable and targeted to families making between 30 and 60 percent of Dane County’s median income, or $85,200 for a household of four. Only 10 units are still available, Gorman’s Wisconsin Market President Ted Matkom said.

The project used $8.5 million of Wisconsin Housing and Economic Development Authority low income tax credits and the city contributed the land within a Tax Incremental Financing district in addition to $1 million of gap financing. Dane County put forward $554,000 of gap financing.

Madison’s Department of Planning, Community & Economic Development director Natalie Erdman said the city’s vision for the site was to see a complete neighborhood with access to transportation, child care and housing.

Central to that vision was affordable housing and creating a place that would draw a diverse group of people together, Erdman said.

“Carbon is really a good example of that mixed income with some quality commercial space that create those vital experiences for people living here, and a way for us to relate to one another in a good quality of housing,” Erdman said.

In 2014, the city set aside $4.5 million per year to create an estimated 250 units of affordable housing per year. Gorman & Co, the developer of Union Corners, was included in the first round of funding, Erdman said.

“This is the beginning of the fruits of those labors and that commitment,” Erdman said.

The first phase of the Union Corners development was the $20 million, two-story UW Health Clinic on the corner of East Washington Avenue and Sixth Street that opened at the end of last year.

Following Carbon, the developer is proposing to build a 59-unit apartment complex in partnership with Lutheran Social Services. The complex would be geared toward extended families, such as grandparents, who are raising other family members’ children.

A five-story, mixed-use apartment complex called Nexus is the fourth phase of the project. The final development in the Union Corners plan will have about 100 apartments, 18,000-square-feet of retail and over 200 enclosed parking spaces.

Gorman & Co CEO Gary Gorman said the goal of the Union Corners site is to create a place where people can live, work and recreate within walking distance.

“We’ve created an urban village here,” Gorman said. “It’s not done, but it will be and I’m very proud of it.”

Residential Component of $60M Wis. Mixed-Use Opens

By Jeffrey Steele of Multi-Housing News

Madison, Wis.—Carbon at Union Corners, a mixed-use community including a 90-residence apartment community with a substantial affordable housing component, has broken ground in Madison, Wis.

union_corners

A long-vacant industrial site once occupied by Ray-O-Vac Corp. is now the site for Gorman & Co.’s new development.

Carbon is the result of a public-private partnership between the city of Madison, Dane County and the state of Wisconsin. It is the second phase and first residential phase of Gorman & Company’s $60 million multi-stage transformation of a long-vacant industrial site once occupied by Ray-O-Vac Corporation. “Union Corners is a master development that we embarked on three years ago,” Gorman & Company’s Milwaukee-based president of the Wisconsin market Ted Matkom told MHN.

“It was started through an RFP process. Ray-O-Vac abandoned the site decades ago, and the city of Madison took title to the big six-acre site and cleaned the site through remediation grants to the point where it was developable. It’s right on a main thoroughfare in Madison called East Washington Avenue, and surrounded by historic neighborhoods that are extremely stable but more moderate income.”

Six neighborhoods touch Union Corners, “and we talked with all of them,” Matkom continued. “The priorities were a place to live, work and play. After that, they identified their top desires as health care, a supermarket, and affordable housing. They really emphasized the need for a development that didn’t gentrify their neighborhood. They wanted something that blended into the neighborhood. We got them the UW Health Clinic, Fresh Thyme grocery and this Carbon development, with a large mix of housing ranging from market rate to apartments earmarked for 30 percent of AMI.”

The construction cost is estimated at $16 million. Completion is slated for June 2017.

Carbon at Union Corners features two four-story buildings linked by courtyard plaza. In addition to the 90 apartment homes, there will be 18,000 square feet of ground-floor specialty retail space and 92 underground parking spaces for residents. Eighty-five percent (or 76) of the one-, two- and three-bedroom apartments will be designated as “affordable” and targeted to families earning 30, 50 or 60 percent of Dane County’s median income, which is $82,600 for a family of four.

Four units will be market rate. Monthly rental rates depend on annual household income, and will range from $380 to $940 for a one-, $455 to $1,245 for a two- and $920 to $1,460 for a three-bedroom unit.

Apartments will feature walk-in closets, in-unit washer-dryers, large kitchens and Magic-Pak self-contained HVAC systems. Amenities include a fitness center with cardio equipment, treadmills, weights and stationary bikes.

When considering acquiring the site, Gorman & Company had to weigh its positives and negatives, Matkom said. “The plus was it is a vacant site remediated by the city of Madison, and 100 percent ready for development,” he reported. “The minus was the site was incorporated in a highly urban area touching six neighborhoods. The time we spent in community meetings was extremely long. There were a lot of stakeholders who had to be appeased to ensure the development was a fit for the community.”

One of the points of contention was surface parking. Neighborhood residents didn’t want a sea of asphalt encircling the development. “They wanted underground parking,” Matkom said. “So we had to put in all underground parking, and from a cost perspective, it was challenging to incorporate that into the project.”

A nod to the site’s history will be woven into Carbon. Bricks from the long-demolished Ray-O-Vac factory will be creatively repurposed, and the vintage French Battery stone signs will be featured in common areas of Union Corners.

Creative reuse turns half of former Catholic seminary in Madison into higher-end apartments

Written by Doug Erickson, Wisconsin State Journal

holy name seminary

Several years ago, leaders of the Madison Catholic Diocese realized they had a big challenge on their hands with the Bishop O’Connor Catholic Pastoral Center, a former seminary and home to the diocesan headquarters.

The majestic but aging building on the city’s Far West Side had become costly to maintain, with only about one-third of it being used on a regular basis.

The diocese hired a developer, and today, about half of the building has been converted to private-market apartments, adding millions of dollars to the city’s tax base. The $21 million project celebrated its grand opening in August, and all 53 apartments are now occupied, ahead of expectations.

“There’s more life to the building now — more people, more activity,” said Monsignor James Bartylla, the diocese’s second-ranking official, adding that the project keeps the “legacy property” in the diocese while preserving much of its spiritual and cultural identity.

The building at 702 S. High Point Road, a few blocks south of the Beltline, opened in 1964 as Holy Name Seminary, a high school for boys interested in possibly becoming priests. The seminary closed in 1995.

The building was rechristened in 1997 as the Bishop O’Connor Catholic Pastoral Center, honoring the founding bishop of the diocese. Its new name, Holy Name Heights, brings the site back full circle.

For apartment dwellers, it offers one of the more unusual residential settings in the city.

The diocesan headquarters remain, imbuing the building with a sense of the sacred. Tenants have 24-hour access to the building’s centerpiece, an on-site chapel with soaring stained glass windows and a 360-piece mosaic that rises three stories behind the altar. Mass is celebrated daily during the week.

For a more secular experience, there’s a full-size gym, newly restored to its retro glory. The 72-acre site offers 2.5 miles of walking paths, a running track, a baseball diamond and fields for football and soccer.

Other amenities include two interior courtyards with arched walkways, a theater room with a 100-inch screen, and a lounge with a balcony offering panoramic views of the city and state Capitol.

“It just seems so special here,” said tenant Christina Busse, 33, a stay-at-home mom who lives in a two-bedroom apartment with her husband, Phillip, 35, and their 21-month-old son, Cephas.

Broad appeal

While anyone can live at the site, diocesan officials thought the apartments might attract mostly empty nesters and Catholics. The appeal has been broader.

Busse, who is Lutheran, said she enjoys praying in the chapel and has found her neighbors to be a friendly bunch that ranges in age from young professionals to retirees. Many seem eager to make personal connections, she said.

“People seem to want relationships here,” she said.

The site appealed to the couple for its serenity, its religious aspects, and its amenities, especially the acres of outdoor space their son can explore as he grows. Their apartment is about a 10-minute drive from Epic Systems Corp., where Phillip Busse, 34, works in technical support services. Christina Busse estimated that nearly a dozen other tenants also work at the electronic medical records giant.

Among the couple’s neighbors are Paul and Kate Stauffacher, the kind of tenants diocesan officials knew would be especially drawn to the property. Retirees in their 70s, they are devout Catholics whose two sons graduated from the former seminary.

The connection for Paul Stauffacher goes even deeper. He taught and coached at the seminary early on, then went on to serve as its principal from 1978-87. His apartment is the seminary’s former weight and equipment room where he spent so much time as a coach.

“This just struck us when we saw it,” Stauffacher said. “There is a certain element of nostalgia, but it goes beyond that. We’re daily Mass attendees, so the chapel is very convenient. We love to get out and exercise on the grounds, and our grandchildren love the gym.”

For some, there’s the added appeal of occasionally bumping into Madison Bishop Robert Morlino, who recently moved into one of the new apartments. He had been living for more than a decade in the rectory at St. Patrick’s Catholic Church, three blocks off the Capitol Square.

‘Uncommon’ project

The diocese, which continues to own the property, hired Gorman & Co. to redevelop the site. The company, based just south of Madison, has stayed on as the on-site manager for the apartments.

Gorman & Co. specializes in adaptive reuses of landmark buildings and has had a long association with the diocese. It successfully nominated the former seminary as a historic landmark. The building is now listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

The designation allowed the company to access $5.8 million in historic tax credits — a critical piece of the financing — and also protects the building’s architectural legacy, said CEO Gary Gorman, a lifelong Catholic who grew up in the Madison area and has served as board president of Catholic Charities Madison. The project was “uncommon” and close to his heart, Gorman said.

“It did something really positive for a diocese that I’ve been a member of for 60 years,” he said. “I’m proud of both the physical and financial results, and in particular the fact that a number of people now get to call this beautiful building their home.”

The city has determined that 46.63 percent of the building is now taxable, with the rest remaining tax-exempt due to its religious use, said Scott West, a city commercial property appraiser. The assessed value of the taxable portion is currently set at $3.43 million by the city, but that number reflects only partial completion of the project, West said. The full assessment, out this April, likely will be around $5.1 million, he said.

The diocese’s 2016 tax bill for the site is $77,532. That figure is based on only the partial assessment.

The project’s total costs of $21 million are so much higher than the city assessed value because the total costs reflect work done on the entire site, not just the part turned into apartments, said Ted Matkom, president of the Wisconsin market for Gorman & Co. The project also addressed major maintenance issues on the aging building such as roofing and plumbing, he said.

One-bedroom apartments rent for $955 to $1,285 per month, while two-bedroom units go for $1,369 to $1,970. That’s probably a little less than top-of-the-line luxury units in Madison, but in the middle to upper range, said Rick Mason, property manager.

Bartylla said the project could help other dioceses think creatively about unused or vacant properties.

“I think we’ve shown that you don’t have to sell church property when it’s underutilized,” he said. “There might be an opportunity to continue ownership while finding something that works for both the diocese and the community.”

“It did something really positive for a diocese that I’ve been a member of for 60 years. I’m proud of both the physical and financial results, and in particular the fact that a number of people now get to call this beautiful building their home.” Gary Gorman, CEO of Gorman & Co., which redeveloped the former Bishop O’Connor Catholic Pastoral Center