Media & News

Gorman Close to Deal with Hilton for Amerock Project

By Mike Buda, May 14, 2015

ROCKFORD (WIFR) — Major developments surround Rockford’s downtown Amerock building. Wisconsin-based developer Gorman and Company tells 23 News that they have received preliminary confirmation the chain will be the franchise for the Amerock project.

Gorman Illinois Market President, André Blakley, says it’s an exciting time to be in Rockford.

Construction is about to begin on Rockford’s former Amerock building, a structure that’s sat empty for more than two decades.

“We think this will be a significant development,” said Blakley. “Significant in terms of jobs, significant in terms of just reactivating this area and revitalizing the downtown district.”

Amerock is not the only thing being re-used and revitalized. As a part of an agreement with Gorman, Rockford is looking at ways to update neighboring Davis Park by complimenting its surrounding buildings.

“It was designed to be a festival park,” said David Sidney, Rockford’s Comprehensive Planning and Design Manager. “We’re trying to assess whether that still makes sense to go forward and how to make it more active in light of the hotel and conference center and all of the other development happening around it.”

Rockford aldermen still need to approve the updated contract with Gorman. It would provide set deadlines for specific parts of the project to be completed.

“We certainly appreciate the stewardship of our council on these issues in making certain that they test these ideas and make certain that the city’s interests are well taken care of,” said Rockford’s Legal Director Patrick Hayes. “We’re excited to be able to continue to present opportunities for this project to move forward.”

Blakley says by the time the new 160 room Amerock Hilton opens up in early 2017, downtown Rockford should be booming once again.

Gorman says they will be closing on the property in the next week or so and should have their finances approved by September.

Hayes says that on the off-chance that Gorman does not get the money, the developer would have the option to sell the building back.

The Brewery’s 100-Unit Frederick Lofts

By , UrbanMilwaukee.com, May 8th, 2015

Not so many years ago, the Pabst Brewing Complex was a ghost town at all hours of the day. The abandoned brewery, which abruptly closed its doors in 1997, served as a highly visible reminder of Milwaukee’s industrial past, looming over Interstate 43 with unused smokestacks and silos. Then in 2006, Joseph Zilber stepped in to buy the complex, rebranding it “The Brewery” and set out to build an entire neighborhood within it.

Gorman & Company has been an important partner of Zilber Ltd in the creation of The Brewery. The Oregon, Wisconsin-based firm has developed the 90-room Brewhouse Inn & Suites hotel in the former brewhouse building and the 95-unit Blue Ribbon Lofts apartments in the former keg house. With many of the historic structures renovated (or in the process of being so), Gorman has now started developing new buildings in the area.

Gorman’s 100-unit Frederick Lofts apartment building is scheduled to open this summer at the northeast corner of W. Juneau Ave. and N. 9th St. The privately-financed project will feature exclusively market-rate apartments. The project is named after Pabst namesake Captain Frederick Pabst. From 1875 to 1892 Pabst lived in a home on the site. Prior to that (and before mechanical refrigeration) tunnels were installed underneath the site to keep beer cold; construction crews found those tunnels on accident last April.

 

This residential project will take advantage of the recently rebuilt W. Juneau Ave., which was converted from a street designed for beer delivery trucks to a more human-scaled boulevard like Broadway in the Historic Third Ward.

Residents of the project will be able to park in an underground parking facility or in a surface lot behind the L-shaped building.

Frederick Lofts residents might soon find themselves with new neighbors as the new owners of the Milwaukee Bucks are seeking to build their own neighborhood just east of the The Brewery in the Park East corridor.

 

Celebrating continuity and new beginnings with redevelopment project

Celebrating continuity and new beginnings with redevelopment project, Madison Catholic Herald, May 1, 2015

Written by Mary C. Uhler, Catholic Herald Staff

Friday, May. 01, 2015 — 3:28 PM

It’s time to celebrate both continuity and new beginnings, said Bishop Robert C. Morlino as he presided at a Mass and groundbreaking ceremonies for the redevelopment of the Bishop O’Connor Catholic Pastoral Center (BOC) on May 1.

After Holy Name Seminary closed in 1995, the building was renovated as a diocesan center and renamed the Bishop O’Connor Catholic Pastoral Center in 1998. The redevelopment of the BOC will maintain diocesan offices, the center’s chapel, and other historic features while adding a vibrant new residential community. Gorman & Company has been engaged by the Diocese of Madison to serve as the developer of the $21 million project and will provide architectural and design services for the redevelopment.

Appropriately, the Mass and groundbreaking ceremonies were held on the feast of St. Joseph the Worker. “We’re doing quite a bit of work here,” said Bishop Morlino, who noted that construction work at the BOC began about a month ago. “We’re doing quite well in the hopes that we will see the fruits of this work in due time.”

Caring about vocations

Following the Mass, Bishop Morlino unveiled and blessed a recently uncovered diocesan coat of arms on the lobby floor, which dates back to when the building was Holy Name Seminary.  Bishop  Morlino observed that Holy Name Seminary was a sign that the priests and people of the diocese cared about vocations. Unveiling the diocesan crest, he said, “will be a reminder of the wonderful history of the diocese and all the good work of Holy Name Seminary.”

The bishop acknowledged that while times change, “We care every bit as much for vocations today. Through many prayers, we have 33 seminarians and we’re doing well in our fund-raising efforts to support them.”

New Life for a Madison Icon: A Celebratory Mass with Bishop Robert C. Morlino marks the groundbreaking ceremonies for the redevelopment of the Bishop O’Connor Catholic Pastoral Center

Gorman DOM Media Release 5-1-2015

MEDIA RELEASE

Friday, May 01, 2015

For More Information:

Susanne Voeltz, for Gorman & Company, Inc.
(608) 284-0848
Brent King, Diocese of Madison
(608) 821-3033
Brent.king@straphael.org

New Life for a Madison Icon:

A Celebratory Mass with Bishop Robert C. Morlino marks groundbreaking ceremonies for the redevelopment of the Bishop O’Connor Catholic Pastoral Center

Historic renovation preserves on site chapel, maintains Diocesan offices and adds a vibrant new residential community

Madison, WI—May 1, 2015—Bishop Robert C. Morlino celebrated Mass for the feast of St. Joseph the Worker today, marking groundbreaking ceremonies for the redevelopment of the Bishop O’Connor Pastoral Center (BOC). Following the mass, Bishop Morlino, flanked by numerous priests of the diocese, unveiled and blessed a recently uncovered diocesan coat of arms, that embellishes the lobby floor of the BOC and dates from its days as Holy Name Seminary.

The former Holy Name Seminary, a neo-Colonial landmark that welcomed its first students in 1964, has served as the Bishop O’Connor Catholic Pastoral Center since the seminary was closed in 1995. The redevelopment plan for the BOC – which preserves its architectural and sacred legacy and ensures strategic stewardship for the 72.6 acre property – was grounded in years of due diligence and study on the part of diocesan councils, consultors, and leadership to determine the best possible outcome for the future of the aging and underutilized former seminary.

Gorman & Company has been engaged by the diocese to serve as the developer of the $21 million project and will provide architectural and design services for the redevelopment. Upon completion of the apartment component of the project in 2016, Gorman & Company will also manage the property. First Business Bank of Madison, WI is providing the financing for the milestone redevelopment.

In anticipation of today’s event, Bishop Morlino expressed his gratitude to all those who are making this project possible, saying “It is a win-win scenario, where the diocese not only retains this historic building, keeping our presence in this most visible sign of the diocese in the community, and preserving the legacy of Holy Name Seminary, but also where new life is breathed onto the campus, which has served the local Church so well. We are so grateful for the excellent cooperation of Gary Gorman and his expert and visionary team.”

To preserve its architectural integrity, the iconic landmark, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, will be renovated as a “certified historic rehabilitation” in compliance with historic preservation guidelines prescribed by the National Park Service. Whenever possible, the BOC’s significant historic and architectural elements will be preserved, refurbished and sensitively integrated into the renovation design.

Key components of the BOC renovation will be incorporating 53 new apartment homes, updating office space for the diocese, Catholic Charities, and affiliated Catholic organizations, including the Catholic Herald and Catholic Radio, and upgrading office and kitchen facilities for Blue Plate Catering. The project will also allow Catholic Charities of Madison to bring more of their agents under one roof.

The on-site Cletus O’Donnell Holy Name Chapel will be maintained and preserved and will continue to offer daily Mass and Eucharistic Adoration during and after the BOC renovation. The chapel interior   is noted for its 360-piece mosaic, assembled in Germany, that rises three-stories behind the altar, and for its dramatic stained glass windows that were crafted in a palette of blues and pastels by the renowned Conrad Schmitt Studios.

The new residential community at the BOC, to be known as Holy Name Heights, will be comprised of 53 one and two-bedroom apartment homes that will combine contemporary living with a historic setting for a special sense of place. Units will be appointed with granite kitchen countertops and islands, stainless steel appliances, luxe plank flooring throughout, efficient cooling and heating systems, and a high speed Wi-Fi network. A guest suite will be available to rent by residents for visiting family and friends. Each unit will have an enclosed, heated parking stall and availability for bike storage as well.

Residents will have access to a host of amenities that are unique to the architectural landmark, including two interior courtyards with cloistered, arched walkways and a full size gymnasium-prime for pick-up basketball games. A wine lounge with a fireplace, stylish seating and a covered balcony offering panoramic views of the city and the Capitol, a theater room, a dance movement studio and fitness center are planned as well. The richly landscaped grounds of the BOC also feature 2.5 miles of walking trails for leisurely strolls or quick sprints.

To recognize and celebrate the BOC’s historic and cultural significance, Gorman & Company will create a dedicated space for a “History Lounge” on the lower level of the building below the chapel. In partnership with the diocese, Gorman & Company will curate a display of memorabilia and photographs chronicling the history of Holy Name Seminary. On site office tenants, residents, and visitors will have a chance to view the collection and learn about the BOC’s spiritual legacy in a warm and inviting setting.

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$44M renovation coming for historic Phoenix neighborhood

By:  Pete Scholz, Channel 12 News, Phoenix, April 23, 2015

An historic Phoenix neighborhood which was slated to be demolished a few years ago is experiencing a renaissance, of sorts.  Residents took in the latest plans at a community meeting in the Coffelt Public Housing Development Thursday.

To look at the 38 acres of 1950′s barrack-style housing occupying the southwest corner of 19th Avenue and Buckeye near downtown Phoenix is to get a glimpse of Arizona’s history.  And, generations of residents have called the Coffelt-Lamoreaux Public Housing Development home.

“The folks that live at Coffelt take an extreme level of pride for where they live,” Brian Swanton, president of the Arizona Market for Gorman  & Company says.  “They didn’t want to move and they were loud and clear about that.  They wanted to stay.”

Over the past two years a unique, public-private relationship was forged to make sure that was going to happen.

Oscar Perdolmo is a 13-year resident of the neighborhood just southwest of downtown.   “I’m excited because I like living here,” he said. “I like my neighbors and the people I live with.  It’s very calm.”

Excitement grew when the Housing Authority of Maricopa County and their partners at Gorman & Company were able to win National Historic Registration for the site built back in 1953. The designation, along with additional financing, has resulted in a $44 million makeover about to launch in the coming months.

“It’s basically a gut rehabilitation, as we call it,” Swanton explained.  “We’re preserving the exterior facade of the buildings but everything will be brand new inside — the bones of the building.”

Swanton also shared that $90,000 has been budgeted for each of the 301 units to be redone.  From the floors to the roofs, upgrades will include cabinetry, appliances, sinks and flooring.  Well-worn swamp coolers will also be scrapped for new heating and air conditioning units.

In addition, plans are also in place to temporarily move tenants to unoccupied units during construction, which should add a little more peace of mind to anxious residents.

“They came in my home and took an inventory of all of my equipment; all of my furniture,”  Antonio Cabrera, a nine-year resident said. “To make sure that they can move it with no cost for myself once the renovations get under way.”

The project is also adding a new and improved park and community center.  And, the developer is hoping to improve air quality in the neighborhood by improving irrigation and  planting more trees along connecting streets.

According to Gorman & Company, the Coffelt renovation is scheduled to begin on or around October 1, 2015, and last about 17 months. Interest in the program is growing, as well.  Housing Authority of Maricopa County says that the waiting list to move into one of the newly-renovated units stands at 1,000 names.

Gorman teams up with Northcott to rebuild depressed Milwaukee Neighborhood

Click on the link below to read the article on Gorman’s Northside Neighborhoods as published on the Wheda Transform Milwaukee website:

Gorman teams up with Northcott to rebuild depressed Milwaukee neighborhood, Wheda Transform Milwaukee website, 2-2015

Aldermen to consider Warren Buffett’s entry into downtown Rockford hotel plans

By Brian Leaf, Rockford Register Star,  Jan. 31, 2015

ROCKFORD — If it were a boxing match, the hype would be huge at next week’s City Council meeting.

“In this corner of North Main and Mulberry streets,” a ring announcer might say, “weighing in at $14.5 million, with aspirations of turning a crumbling, two-story building back to life as a five-floor, 76-room boutique hotel, from Rockford, Illinois — Joseph James Partners.”

“And in this corner of Wyman and Cedar streets, weighing in at $64 million, a developer pining to turn an eyesore skyscraper into a shimmering waterfront Embassy Suites hotel, the cornerstone of a downtown revival. He’s backed by the world’s best-known capitalist, Warren Buffett. From Oregon, Wisconsin, ladies and gentlemen — Gorman & Company.”

Those ringside at City Hall on Monday will hear aldermen consider only a proposal by Joseph James to redevelop 134 N. Main St., where the advertising agency Trekk used to lease space. But a memo from the heavyweights, who plan to turn the Amerock building into a 150-room hotel, will also be on their minds.

CEO Gary Gorman shocked the city last spring by proposing a $53 million hotel and convention center downtown, the type of central city revitalization that generations of Rockford mayors have tried and failed to orchestrate. Gorman announced Thursday that a subsidiary of Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway is investing $18 million in the project, which has swelled to $64 million. Plans for the hotel will be finished Friday and bidding for construction contracts will commence the next week, he said.

Gorman’s interest was catalyzed by the $21 million indoor sports center being built in another vacant factory across the Rock River from Amerock and the availability of state and federal tax credits worth up to 45 percent of construction costs. When the sports complex ramps up, proponents say, it will draw thousands of families, players and fans downtown for basketball, volleyball and other sports tournaments.

They’ll need a place to stay.

Joseph James, which is led by SupplyCore CEO Peter Provenzano, submitted its first hotel proposal in November 2013. It initially sought to develop hotel rooms in two buildings, then settled on one hotel with a restaurant in the former Trekk building.

Both hotel camps sent memos to aldermen and city officials this week.

Gorman said he’s concerned about too many new rooms in an unproven market.

“We have done our due diligence analyzing the market trends and data and consulted with our partners on this project and have concluded that another hotel in the downtown opening at the same time or sooner is a serious threat to the viability of our project,” he wrote.

Provenzano quoted a Jan. 24 memo from a hotel consultant hired by the city and Rockford Area Convention & Visitors Bureau, Hunden Strategic Partners of Chicago, that said there’s plenty of room downtown for both projects.

Provenzano said the sports complex is slated to open in June 2016 and he hopes to have his hotel open then. The Gorman project won’t be ready until early 2017, he said. Hunden said both hotels will have time to ramp up and succeed because there is a six-month gap between the scheduled openings. Branded hotels and boutique hotels also serve different types of travelers, the consultant noted.

Provenzeno said one could argue that his project will pave the way for Gorman by helping create a hotel market downtown. With no hotel rooms downtown, there’s a risk that demand will be satisfied by east-side Rockford hotels.

“I hope his project happens,” he said Friday. “We think these projects are very beneficial to one another.”

In 2011, Gorman and Mayor Larry Morrissey were part of an Illinois trade delegation to China, a country that is likely to produce most, if not all, of the 96 wealthy foreigners who will invest $46 million into Gorman’s hotel in a federal cash for a visa program called EB-5.

Morrissey, a three-term mayor first elected in 2005, campaigned on downtown revival. Provenzano, a longtime Morrissey supporter, rehabbed the former Pioneer Life building, 303 N. Main St., for his company’s headquarters and other offices.

Morrissey wants both projects to move forward.

“I’ve had a number of conversations directly with Gary Gorman,” he said. “I think he understands my position and I understand his. He’s got a project. He’s doing everything he has to do to manage it. I’ve committed to do everything I can to do to support his efforts.

“What I’ve explained to him and others is that we’re not just selling one project. We’re selling our downtown renaissance.”