Tag Archives: Milwaukee

NEW MIXED-USE LIBRARY TO HELP REINVIGORATE MITCHELL ST.

By Bill Glauber, Milwaukee Journal Sentinal, September 2, 2015

Nancy Bush (right) helps Mixtli Murillo, 6, with a snack at an open house for people to learn about a new Milwaukee Public Library branch that will open in the historic Hills building at S. 9th St. and W. Historic Mitchell St.

MILWAUKEE – Right now, it’s just open space on the first floor of the gracious Hills building in the heart of a historic neighborhood on Milwaukee’s near south side. But by late 2016 or early 2017, there will be books, computers and furnishings in a 21st-century library that will be designed to serve as an educational and neighborhood anchor at 906-910 W. Historic Mitchell St.

On Wednesday, the public was invited to an open house to tour the site and offer suggestions for the future home of the Milwaukee Public Library branch. When completed, the Mitchell St. facility will replace the near half-century-old branch at 1432 W. Forest Home Ave.The new library is part of a trend in Milwaukee of replacing old brancheswith new ones that are part of mixed-use developments.

In mixed-use development, retail shopping is often placed on the first floor with housing on the upper floors. The city has tweaked the model by putting libraries at street level with housing above. The Mitchell St. library will be topped by 57 market-rate apartments.

“We are on the leading edge nationally of using a mixed-use model for library development,” Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett said.

The model — already used at the East Branch and Villard Square — enables the city to get more bang for its buck. By 2020, six Milwaukee libraries will be mixed-use facilities.

“We are really proud of the fact that at a time when resources are strapped we continue to invest in the libraries,” Barrett said.

Gorman Co. is the developer of the $10.4 million project, which includes $4.4 million in city funding for the library. The firm is applying for state and federal historic tax credits. The apartments will be designed by Quorum. Architectural firm HGA will design the new 16,000-square-foot library. There will be an attempt to blend the old with the new.

The building, constructed in 1919 as the Hills Department Store, is on the National Register of Historic Places. It retains architectural flourishes, including decorative features at the top of columns, historic stair railings and a mezzanine.

“Those are things you just can’t duplicate in a new building,” said Jane Dedering, associate vice president of HGA. Dedering said modern libraries need flexible spaces to cater to multiple uses and patrons who range from toddlers to seniors.

“Daylight is huge,” she said. “And really connecting with the community is important so it doesn’t feel generic.”

Sam McGovern-Rowen, Milwaukee’s library construction project manager, said people constantly ask “what do we need libraries for? Part of the thing we need them for is they’re town halls of the neighborhood, a gathering place, a community center.”

The Mitchell St. site sits nearby the St. Anthony School of Milwaukee and is within walking distance of South Division High School. The library will serve one of the youngest and most diverse communities in the city.

“We want the kids in this city to be using our libraries both in the summer and after school,” Barrett said.

Paula Kiely, director of the Milwaukee Public Library, said the Mitchell St. facility is “going to be a real jewel.”

Laura Gutierrez, vice president of academic affairs at St. Anthony School, said that as an educator “it’s phenomenal” to have the library coming to the new location.

“I want every resource to prepare the students academically, and resources for the workforce,” she said.

Julio Maldonado, of the Cesar Chavez Business Improvement District, said he was eager to see the library serve as a community space for everything from children doing their homework to providing an incubator for entrepreneurs.

Adam Carr, an artist who collaborated on a “Listening to Mitchell” project, said “people want something alive again” in the space.

“Mitchell Street is where the south side happened,” he said.

And a library, Carr said, is a place that can lead Mitchell St. into a new era.

FREDERICK LOFTS REPRESENTS “TIPPING POINT” FOR CITY

At the dedication of 100-unit market-rate apartment building at the former Pabst Brewery, mayor hopeful for continued growth of downtown housing.

By Michael Horne, Urban Milwaukee, August 13th, 2015

MILWAUKEE - There was a time that when you referred to a city’s “Tipping Point,” you were talking about a catalytic event that led to a community’s decline. Today, the phrase, as applied to the City of Milwaukee, has a different connotation, says Mayor Tom Barrett.

“Milwaukee is at a tipping point,” he told a group of 50 people gathered Wednesday at the dedication of the Frederick Lofts, 840 W. Juneau Ave. “Not a negative tipping point, but a positive tipping point.”

The 100-unit apartment building was developed by Gorman & Company, Inc. at the east end of the former Pabst Brewery.

Prior to the purchase of the long-vacant brewery site by the Zilber Group, “there was no reason to come here,” the mayor said. In fact, the place was so desolate that “even the bad guys wouldn’t come here,” he added.

But today, “what is happening literally before our eyes are young people and the young at heart coming downtown. It’s a national phenomenon,” the mayor said. “Downtown is 3.6% of the landmass and 18% of the tax base” of the city, he said.

As if on cue, the sidewalks outside began to fill with workers from downtown office buildings as they left work, heading to their homes, some in The Brewery neighborhood itself. Gorman & Company developed the adjacent Blue Ribbon Lofts apartment building out of the former Pabst Keg House. In addition, Gorman developed the Brewhouse Inn & Suites one block west. The new development is immediately south of the Brewery Point Apartments, a senior living community.

Ald. Bob Bauman, whose 4th district represents that 18% of the city’s tax base, and is the focus of its tipping point, joked that “groundbreakings and ribbon cuttings are getting routine.”

Ted Matkom, the Wisconsin Market President for Gorman, said the site “was the poster child for blight in Milwaukee.” He recounted the failed attempt to turn the area into an entertainment district that would have required the demolition of many buildings. Such entertainment districts did not survive the great recession, he said. After that effort failed, Joe Zilber declared that the Pabst site “was going to be my legacy.”

Things were tough at first, Matkom said. Some 30 restaurateurs turned down a chance to open what is now Jackson’s Blue Ribbon Pub at the Brewhouse Inn & Suites, including what he called “all the big players.” Today, Jackson’s, run by Mark Zierath, who was in the audience (and who catered the event) “is killing it!” Matkom said. The Blue Ribbon Lofts, dating to 2008, are “100% occupied,” he said. The 90-room hotel has some of the top rates in the city,” and hopes are high for the Frederick Lofts.

As Bauman noted, the location is a success despite being in sight of the County Jail and a state secure detention facility.

John Kersey, the Zilber Group Vice President said “We would not have imagined market-rate housing when we started this thing.”

Today, market rate at the Frederick Lofts starts at $1,350 for studios and $1,790 for a two bedroom unit.

Three models were on display, and I toured them with Gary Gorman, the president of the firm that developed and owns the property. This is 100% new construction, with high-end features like granite countertops and floor-to-ceiling windows. A live-work unit of 696 square feet has a sliding partition that separates the work unit, accessible from the street, from the live unit. For those eager go-getters who like to bound out of the bedroom and straight into the kitchen for a hearty breakfast, there is no door between the two rooms to slow things down.

Gorman noted the floors of the units, which are uniform throughout, and consist of a wood-grain pattern and texture. The material is described in the sales material as “luxury hard surface plank in natural wood,” but it is a vinyl type product. Gorman says from experience, he has to replace carpets every three years, and this material should be more durable. I would rather it express its inner vinylness rather than masquerade as wood, and I found the texture to be unnecessary.

Among the attendees was Jim Haertel, who owns Best Place across the street. He now has 35 employees. His wife Nancy says their facility is nearly completely booked for 2016, including for the wedding of Urban Milwaukee CEO Jeramey Jannene and Alison Peterson and is now taking reservations for 2017. One of the couple’s favorite weddings of 2015 was that of Ald. Nik Kovac and Grace Fuhr in July, where guests arrived by bicycle. Dan McCarthy, who was instrumental in the development of the project, (and was on the wrong side of the Pabst City plan) was there as was banker Jon Mulcahy. Also in attendance was Joy Smith, a resident of the Blue Ribbon Lofts who writes a neighborhood newsletter.

The building has a nice rooftop deck with a kitchenette, and a number of people were gathered there during the event. The building has a partial green roof of sedum that looks in fine shape for a recent installation. The bioswales outside seem to have done their work during recent heavy downpours, as evidenced by the line of silt seen on some of the plants there.

The final word on the tipping point came from the mayor, who said “my wife wants to move downtown!” Barrett says that may happen soon, once the kids are out of the house.

Apartments, library recommended for south side building

By Tom Daykin of the Journal Sentinel, Dec. 17, 2014

A south side building would be redeveloped into a Milwaukee library branch and 33 apartments under a proposal recommended Tuesday night by city officials.

The Forest Home Library, at 1432 W. Forest Home Ave., would be replaced by a new library branch on the street level of an underused four-story building at 906-910 W. Historic Mitchell St.

That $10.4 million project, proposed by a partnership of development firm Gorman & Co., property owner Mitchell Investment Properties and construction manager VJS Construction Services Inc., would include market-rate apartments on the renovated building’s upper floors, and 96-space parking lot.

The Milwaukee Public Library’s Board of Trustees selected the Gorman proposal over a competing proposal from Cardinal Capital Management Inc. and Journey House to develop a library, 51 units of affordable housing and additional commercial space within a new four-story building at 1135 S. Cesar Chavez Drive.

The trustees selected the Gorman proposal because its market-rate apartments complement the library and would create a catalytic project for the neighborhood, said Brooke VandeBerg,  library communications and marketing director.

The Mitchell St. location is central to the library’s service area, within a prominent business district, VandeBerg said.

Also, the project can be completed within a short time frame, and the developers have a secure financing strategy, including the use of state and federal historic preservation tax credits, she said.

The 80,000-square-foot building, built in 1919 as the Hills Department Store, is only about 30% leased, said John Kesselman, the property’s listing agent.

The building has had difficulties finding tenants since United Migrant Opportunity Services Inc. moved its headquarters to 2701 S. Chase St. around 10 years ago.

A board committee last week declined to recommend either the Gorman or Cardinal Capital proposal due to concerns about financing, and a lack of details. The Gorman proposal initially included affordable apartments, which would have needed additional tax credits for financing the project.

The board on Tuesday night also expressed interest in another proposal recommended by that committee: to replace the Mill Road Library, at 6431 N. 76th St., with a four-story structure to be built on a city-owned lot at 7717 W. Good Hope Road.

A partnership of Milwaukee-based Maures Development Group LLC, St. Paul, Minn.-based CommonBond Communities Inc., and Milwaukee-based Engberg Anderson Inc. would develop a library, 46 affordable apartments on the upper levels, potential street-level commercial space, on-site parking and outdoor green space, according to the conceptual plans.

Before making a final decision, the board wants more information on the Maures proposal, including a review of the developer’s market study, VandeBerg said.

Both projects also would require Common Council approval.

From Foreclosures, Affordable Housing

Affordable Housing Finance, 2014 LIHTC Yearbook

A Wisconsin developer’s large-scale initiative in neighborhoods on Milwaukee’s North Side is helping reverse the damage of the Great Recession and foreclosure crisis.  By purchasing vacant lots and foreclosed homes from the city, Gorman & Co. has aided in neighborhood revitalization, homeownership opportunities, and job creation.

Over the course of seven phases, the developer built or rehabbed 282 single-family homes or duplexes affordable to residents earning between 30 percent and 60 percent of the area median income.

“All of those homes that we redeveloped within the neighborhoods are in a high demand because people in this day and age really find it hard to own a home but want the space of a home to raise a family,” says Ted Matkom, Wisconsin market president for Gorman & Co.

Gorman refurbished the homes, many of which date back to the early 1900s, with modern amenities, appliances and security systems.  “You literally get a new home, in a sense, when you move in,” Matkom says.

After the 15-year compliance period, residents living within the single-family homes will have the opportunity to purchase them for the remaining debt, which is projected to be approximately $35,000.

The acquisition and rehabilitation work also has provided a needed jobs boost in the city.  Gorman partnered with nonprofit Northcott Neighborhood House to create a training program for chronically unemployed local residents with challenged backgrounds.  Through the program, men and women were trained to do construction trade work and demolition work.

Low-income housing tax credits (LIHTCs) were vital to the developer’s work.  The $56.6 million initiative was financed with $44.1 million in LIHTC equity.  Additional financing included Neighborhood Stabilization Program funds from the city of Milwaukee.

“The LIHTC program really makes the housing sustainable for years to come,” says Matkom.  “And it really revitalizes the housing stock with minimal subsidy.”

SPECIAL REPORT: Inn-Side Story

By Cassandra Vinch, Internet Director, WAOW

We’re excited to bring you a brand new series here at Newsline 9. We are opening the doors and giving you the Inn-Side Story to unique and inn-teresting hotels in our state.

“I’d like to welcome you to the Brewhouse Inn and Suites,” said Sue Kinas.

This Milwaukee building has only been a hotel for a little more than a year, but the walls carry a much richer history.

“If you look straight up, you’ll be looking up into one of the six original brew kettles. These were the original kettles. These were put in here in 1882,” Kinas said.

Those six kettles brewed hundreds of barrels of Pabst Blue Ribbon beer a day – but they didn’t always look this way.
“Pabst left town in a very big hurry. They were operating here for many, many years.”

The brewery closed its doors in 1996, leaving an uncertain future for the area. That was until a Milwaukee man bought it in 2006. Then the restoration process began.

“That was part of the preservation project, that as much of the integrity of the original building was kept in tact,” Kinas told Newsline 9.

Many of the walls are part of the original architecture and the columns have been preserved as well. As you can imagine, turning it into a hotel had its challenges.

“It was a huge mix of making sure the original integrity of the building was kept in place, as well as making sure the sustainability of the neighborhood’s needs were met.”

If the brew kettles weren’t enough of an ode to beer, the more than 1,500 bottles on the front desk do the trick.
“All the different beer bottles represent the local breweries in Milwaukee, both old, new, large, small and the craft beers in the area too.”

Construction workers had the tough task of drinking the beer.

Also on the first floor – the Blue Room, which used to be a break room for Pabst employees and their guests.

“The Milwaukee Police Department would come in between their shifts and come and sip the beer and talk to the employees.”
So, it was named the Blue Room after Milwaukee’s finest.

Now, we head upstairs.

“The space you are looking at down here is the original brewing floor. And these were the six brewing kettles that were here.”

Milwaukee visitors who aren’t staying at the hotel say they couldn’t pass up the opportunity to check it out.

“It’s quite awe inspiring to see the original architecture, some of it’s still in place with the brew kettles,” said Curtis Polley from Coerdalene, Idaho.

So we’ve seen the lobby and we’ve seen the former brewery floor. Now it’s time to check out the rooms.

“A lot of the kitchen tables throughout the building are re purposed. And a lot of the headboards in the suites are all re purposed from the building too,” Kinas said.

Pieces of wood left here and there, given new life. There are plenty of rooms to choose from – from standard to king suites – 90 in all.

“One of the things that we always tell everybody when they come for a tour is that they can come and stay here 90 times because we have 90 suites and every time you stay your experience will be great. But it will be different every time.”

The front of the Brewhouse Inn and Suites is no different. The interior may have change, but architects ensured the outside was just as recognizable as it was years ago.

The average room will cost you between $189, up to $459.

Milwaukee Middle School Revived To House Seniors

By Lindsay Machak, Multifamily Executive, July 16, 2014

A building that once catered to a Milwaukee community’s youth has been brought back to life to house seniors.
Gorman & Company recently transformed a former middle school into 68 affordable units of senior housing in a $14.466 million renovation.

The school was originally built in 1926 as Peckham Junior High and was renamed Jackie Robinson Middle School to serve children in the Sherman Park neighborhood. The school closed in 2005 as enrollment declined. Ted Matkom, senior development manager and general counsel for Oregon, Wis.-based Gorman, says the project was part of a larger initiative with Milwaukee Pubic Schools to repurpose schools that had closed.

“We did the senior housing on the land and then subdivided the North side of the parcel to be for the sale of single family homes,” he says.

The adaptive-reuse project, now named Sherman Park Commons, allows residents to stay close to their families and friends who live in the neighborhood. Some residents were even students at the school once upon a time. Many of the original lockers were worked into the new design and some units feature original chalkboards from the school.

“Someone always has memories,” Matkom says. “Those people love the warmth of the hardwood and it reminds them of the glory days of the 50s and 60s.”

Artwork throughout the building is focused on remembering the history of the neighborhood and the significance of the school and includes murals, photo cutouts, and collages that highlight the historical significance of the neighborhood.

The senior living facility is situated on a five-acre triangular plot at a well-traveled intersection and was covered with worn metal fencing and asphalt when the building was purchased in 2009.

To connect the residents with the surrounding community, gardens were also planned into the development. The garden had 28 raised beds installed by a local initiative, the Victory Garden Initiative. All of the plots were accounted for this spring with the hopes of supplying residents and the surrounding neighborhood with fresh, local produce, Matkom says.

The community, which was completed in July 2012 and opened in May 2013, is currently 100 percent leased.

Foundation for the Future

By: Affordable Housing News, Summer 2014

Gorman & Company, a well-established development firm with an extensive portfolio in the Milwaukee area, specializes in providing quality affordable housing to communities that need it most. The company is now using its expertise with the Washington Park Homeowners Initiative (WPHI).

The initiative is geared toward a revitalization effort in Milwaukee’s north side neighborhoods, which were particularly affected by the recent economic downturn. WPHI represents the sixth phase of a larger project, and Gorman & Company plans to continue with at least three more development phases to provide more homeownership opportunities in the area.
“The Washington Park Homeowners Initiative is actually the sixth phase of a much larger initiative that we’re doing in the north side of Milwaukee, which has been ravaged by the foreclosure crises,” says Ted Matkom, Wisconsin Market President for Gorman& Company. “it’s really a product that the neighborhoods are looking for right now.”

ADDRESSING A NEED
Milwaukee’s north side neighborhoods rely heavily on the manufacturing sector for jobs, and in recent years have seen a significant number of these jobs disappear. The housing crises in 2008-2009 exacerbated this problem.

“Many jobs fled Milwaukee to go overseas, and combined with the foreclosure crises and the recession, these north side neighborhoods went into a tailspin that resulted in blighted, vacant homes. That’s why the city has so many tax-foreclosed homes,” Matkom says. “We are purchasing tax-foreclosed homes for $1 each and renovating them with tax credits to stabilize the neighborhood and put those properties back on the tax roll.”

With these initiatives, Gorman & Company is providing options to residents on the city’s north side. The firm is focusing on creating safe, stable neighborhoods that, over the course of numerous efforts, will help to make it an overall more desirable place to live.

According to Matkom, demand for these types of residential options is high on the north side.
“It’s a lower-income neighborhood that really needed an update to the housing stock,” Matkom says. “What’s amazing about it, and the reason why we have so many phases, is the demand. We’ve got waiting lists for single-family homes of 50 people. We would have more, but they get stale, so we keep it at 50. We keep trying to make it a better situation with every phase.”

DEVELOPMENT INITIATIVES
The WPHI effort also aims to provide opportunities to help those in need get the skills and experience they need to find jobs. Gorman & Company has partnered with nonprofit organizations to accomplish these goals.

“We’ve done workforce development initiatives with Northcott Neighborhood House, which is using federal, state and local funds to finance the development,” Matkom says. “We assist the chronically homeless and unemployed, in addition to those coming out of the criminal justice system, to cross-train in several trades. Once they graduated from that soft skills and hard skills course, they are put onto a shift that works on siding and demolition for our projects, which are real-time projects to help build a resume. Then they can go off and get hired by the workforce and third-party contractors.”

Engaging in these efforts creates challenges for Gorman & Company, as the firm must work with a significant number of newly trained workers while still completing its developments on time. According to Matkom, however, it’s well worth the effort.

“We create probably 28 family-supporting jobs each phase through that program, and they get hired off to third-party contractors at a regular pace,’ he says. “It’s a challenge for us to keep the quality of the workmanship up, but it’s a good challenge because it’s actually placing people in jobs as a result of the training.”

FOUNDATION FOR THE FUTURE
Part of Gorman & Company’s motivation for pursuing these extensive revitalization efforts is their overall alignment with the company’s goals. It specializes in working through tax credit initiatives to improve areas that may need additional help. Before beginning efforts in any neighborhood, the firm surveys the community to gain insights about the needs and challenges present.

“Typically, the most challenging projects these communities foresee are the ones that are in our wheelhouse, which are eliminating blight or revitalizing an area that’s blighted,” Matkom says. “This was kind of the prefect project for us because it did have all of those components, which was workforce development and meeting a need in a community to stabilize these north side neighborhoods.”

Moving ahead, Matkom hopes Gorman & Company’s methods for WPHI and beyond will be recognized and replicated elsewhere. Because the firm operates on a housing and economic development model, the company’s leadership is eager to see its long-term effects not only in Milwaukee but also in other adversely affected cities throughout the Midwest.

“I think this model we’ve created in Milwaukee is a true model that can be replicated in other Midwest communities that have lost a lot of manufacturing jobs and were hit by the foreclosure crisis,” Matkom says. “Many Midwest cities suffering from a post-manufacturing letdown from the recession could use this model to rebuild some challenging neighborhoods and make them great workforce housing neighborhoods like they were in the 1950’s and ‘60’s.”

Developer Gorman realizing impact of housing at Pabst

By Sean Ryan, Milwaukee Business Journal, March 21, 2014

Developer Gary Gorman said he now knows the market for apartments in The Brewery in Milwaukee because there is a waiting list of people trying to get into his existing Blue Ribbon Lofts there.

That’s a good confidence builder as Gorman & Co. Inc. prepares to break ground on 100 additional market-rate apartments in The Brewery campus north of downtown Milwaukee.

But it wasn’t always this way, said Gorman, CEO of the Oregon, Wis.-based company. Development of the 95-unit Blue Ribbon Lofts, which opened in 2009, was a “white-knuckle ride,” he said, because the redevelopment of the large former Pabst Brewing Co. campus was just starting.

“I thought that was a pretty high-risk thing,” he said of the Blue Ribbon Lofts. “I didn’t know how the market would react.”

Blue Ribbon Lofts, which has a mix of market-rate and affordable apartments, is performing well, driving the follow-up Frederick Lofts project that will open in July 2015. Other buildings at The Brewery will be converted into housing for seniors and foreign college students.

“We were the pioneer in terms of residential,” Gorman said. “People will move into challenged or new neighborhoods if you give them an interesting place to live.”

Whitestone Realty Capital, New York City, is planning an up to $46 million restoration of buildings in The Brewery to create 124 senior housing units. Construction is expected to begin in April for a July 2015 opening.

Blue Ribbon Management LLC plans to renovate a different building in The Brewery into 360 housing units for foreign students attending Milwaukee colleges. That project also includes a 40-room extended-stay hotel.

Frederick Lofts at Pabst

By , Reporter- Milwaukee Business Journal, March 15, 2014

Work will start this month on Gorman & Co.’s market-rate apartment project in The Brewery in Milwaukee after the developer secured financing and bought the project site.

The four-story building will open to tenants in July 2015, with rents starting at $1,350 for a one-bedroom and $1,750 for a two-bedroom unit. The three live/work units will start at $1,450 a month.

The Frederick Lofts will be built at North Ninth Street and West Juneau Avenue in the former Pabst Brewing Co. campus just outside of downtown Milwaukee.

BMO Harris Bank has closed on $10.3 million in financing for the project, said Gary Gorman, chief executive officer of Gorman & Co., Oregon, Wis. Gorman also has $6 million through a Chinese investor. Chinese investors, through the federal EB-5 immigration program, have financed several projects in The Brewery in exchange for green cards.

This investor, however, simply is putting money into the project without using the federal program, Gorman said. The investor, who Gorman met through his connections in Shanghai, selected the project after touring The Brewery and the Brewhouse Inn & Suites hotel that Gorman developed.

“He made the decision on the spot,” Gorman said. “Just made a $6 million decision on the spot and shook our hands and said, ‘That’s it.’ We had to talk him into hiring a lawyer for it. He said, ‘But I just shook hands with Gorman.’”

Gorman last week also closed the $1.4 million land purchase for the site with The Brewery’s owners. which is run by executives at Zilber Property Group.

Gorman’s project is among a slew that developers are getting out of the ground this spring in that area.

“Part of it is interest rates are very favorable right now,” Gorman said. “That really makes the numbers work, and the demand is good.”

Pabst apartments site sells for $1.4 million

By Tom Daykin, The Journal Sentinal, March 18, 2014

A planned apartment site at downtown Milwaukee’s former Pabst brewery has  been sold to a developer for $1.4 million.

The 1.3-acre site, at 810-840 W. Juneau Ave., was sold to Frederick Lofts  LLC, an affiliate of Oregon, Wis.-based Gorman & Co., by Brewery Project  LLC, according to state real estate documents recorded Monday.

Gorman in August announced it would develop a four-story building with  100 high-end units, known as Frederick Lofts, at that site. Construction is to  begin this spring, with the building completed by spring 2015.

This will be the third development Gorman has done at the former Pabst  complex, now known as The Brewery.

Gorman converted the former keg house into the 95-room Blue Ribbon Lofts  apartments, 901 W. Winnebago St., and converted the former brewhouse and  millhouse into the 90-room Brewhouse Inn & Suites hotel, 1215 N. 10th  St.